‘The Hurt Locker’ houses the horrors of war

Kathryn Bigelow’s “The Hurt Locker” would be predictable as a horror movie. You come in expecting monsters to jump out of the closet and for the most part, that’s what you get.

But still, you watch with a sense of foreboding.

“The Hurt Locker’s” monsters appear in broad daylight when the sun is beating down your neck. They hide under ground and under cars and strapped to the flesh of human bodies. They’re the stuff of nightmares that haunt grown men and women even after they’re far away from war.

And worse yet, they’re real.

The monsters I’m referring to, of course, are the improvised explosive devices that have killed thousands of soldiers over the years. As of 2013, more than 36,000 U.S. soldiers were dead or wounded from IED attacks in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Bigelow shows us these casualties with grainy, distorted video. The feet of women and children scampering across crowded roads. The hums from tanks and the honks of cars. It feels like we’re too close up to see the full picture, and in some ways we are.

“The Hurt Locker,” written by Iraq war journalist Mark Boal, follows a small U.S. bomb dissembling unit in Bagdad, 2004. They spend their aldrenaline-filled days counting bombs they’re dissembled, times they’ve almost died, and the number of days before they can return home.

This gets much more complicated when the group welcomes a new sergeant, William James (Jeremy Renner), the devil-may-care Explosive Ordnance Disposal officer who has trouble following Sgt. Sanborn’s (Anthony Mackie) orders.

This adds much more tension to a mentally and physically draining film. As you’re watching men dissemble bombs with the precision of neurosurgeons, you’re hands ball into fists and your fingernails dig half-moon crescents into the meaty part of your palm.

This next second could be the one where a guy with a burner cell phone fires an IED. This next minute could be the one when another U.S. soldier returns home in a coffin wrapped with an American flag.

I can’t tell you that no one dies in this film. People do — both physically and psychologically — killing men, marriages and the mind. But even though “The Hurt Locker” hurts to watch, it’s worth watching.

Bigelow’s “The Hurt Locker” does what television did with the Vietnam war: it gives you a greater understanding of the horrors.

“The Hurt Locker” was directed by Kathryn Bigelow and written by Mark Boal. The film won 2010 Academy Awards for best original score, best achievement in cinematography, best achievement in sound editing, best achievement in sound mixing, best achievement in film editing, best original screenplay, best achievement in directing and best motion picture of the year. 

 

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